Daniel F. Dawalt

M, b. 18 April 1887, d. 18 June 1914
     Daniel F. Dawalt was also known as "Little Dan". He was born on 18 April 1887 at Washington Co., IN. He was the son of Francis M. Dawalt and Nancy Coombs. Daniel F. Dawalt married Nelle V. Whitson, daughter of Thomas W. Whitson and Belle Dora Nuckles, on 3 October 1908 at Washington Co., IN. Daniel F. Dawalt died on 18 June 1914 at Franklin Twp., Washington Co., IN, at age 27 OBITUARY - The Salem Leader or The Salem Democrat, Salem Indiana; June __, 1914:

DANIEL DAWALT
     Daniel Dawalt, son of Frank M. and Nancy Dawalt, was born April 18, 1887. Died June 18, 1914, at the home of his mother, Mrs. J. B. Dawalt, northeast of Salem, where he had been ill for several weeks – a sufferer from tubercular trouble.
     The brief life of twenty-seven years was brought to a close by the Great Summons to the mysterious bourne, “where drop the still dews of quietness.”
     A part of his early life was spent on the farm, but he was an engineer of ability, having worked in that capacity in and around Salem for years.
     When almost a boy he had charge of a traction engine, spent some time on the railroad, was employed by the Salem Milling Company for quite a while and in recent years became an expert chauffeur and as such, his services were much in demand.
     He was married to Miss Nellie Whitson, October 3, 1908, and to this union were born two children, Kenneth and Raymond. He is survived by his two sons, his wife, mother and three sisters.
     The funeral service was held at Franklin church, conducted by Rev. M. M. Carmichael, of Little York, Ind. The body was laid to rest in the cemetery.

Children of Daniel F. Dawalt and Nelle V. Whitson

Daniel Dawalt Jr.1

M, b. 6 April 1846, d. 2 October 1866
     Daniel Dawalt Jr. was born on 6 April 1846 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1
Note: Letter from Sarah Thompson to Dan Dawalt, Jr.

Elmwood Ills
August 15, 1865

Dear Sir
it is with Pleasure that I take my pen in hand to let you know that wee are all well at present and hope that those few lines may find you well Well Dan I went to A circus yesterday and it was a grand show Well Dan it is raining and I cant go to Church give my love and Best respects to your Sister Mary and tell her to wright to me Now as you sent john A pocture I think you must send me one and I will send you one there is some prity girls here Dan you must come see us and (the word “stay” is crossed out and is followed by the work “this”) spend the winter
Well I Must Close My letter so no more at present But Remain youre friend

Sarah Thompson
To Dan Dawalt
wright soon


Tracy Devault's note: In the 1860 Census for Elmwood, Peoria Co., Illinois, there is a Sarah Thompson (age 17, b. Iowa), living with parents Elijah (age 50, b. Ohio) and Elizabeth (age 34, b. Iowa). Also in the census were Sarah’s siblings Esther (age 14, B. Iowa), John (age 11, b. Iowa), Julia (age 9, b. Iowa), Jane (age 7, b. Iowa) and Josephine (age 2, born Illinois). Given Sarah’s age and the fact that she mentions “sister Mary”, I think Sarah was writing to Dan Dawalt, Jr. I have no idea how Sarah Thompson came to know the Dawalts. This letter was found in the collection of Daniel Dawalt. Sr. letters in the Filson Historical Society, Louisville, KY.

Daniel Dawalt Jr. died on 2 October 1866 at age 20. He was buried in October 1866 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Citations

  1. [S954] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, Series M432, Roll 179.

Effie Dawalt

F, b. 21 August 1890, d. 25 September 1890
     Effie Dawalt was born on 21 August 1890 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Samuel W. Dawalt and Mary L. E. Thompson. Effie Dawalt died on 25 September 1890 at Washington Co., IN. She was buried in September 1890 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Elizabeth Dawalt

F, b. 15 March 1807, d. 8 June 1909
     Elizabeth Dawalt was born on 15 March 1807 at Tennessee. She was the daughter of Henry DeWald and Elizabeth Gross. Elizabeth Dawalt married William Payne, son of Jeremiah H. Payne and Sarah McCoy, on 27 January 1825 at Washington Co., IN. Elizabeth Dawalt died on 8 June 1909 at Waxahachie, Ellis Co., TX, at age 102 OBITUARY:

LIVED TO PASS CENTURY MARK
Mrs. Elizabeth Payne Dies at Age of 100 Years and Three Months.
Four years ago when Mrs. Elizabeth Payne of this city celebrated her ninety-sixth birthday she told her relatives and friends that if she could only live to see the hundredth anniversary of her birth she would be perfectly contented to die. On the fifteenth day of last March this wish was gratified and at 12:20 Tuesday morning this aged lady was called to her reward. She had been exceedingly feeble for several days and her death was momentarily expected. She passed away peacefully and with a smile on her lips.
Mrs. Payne was born March 15, 1809, on the banks of the Cumberland river in Tennessee. Her maiden name was Dawault. When she was two years old her parents moved to Indiana, where she was married to William Payne on January 25, 1825. She came with her husband to Texas in 1873 and located in Waxahachie, where she resided continuously until called to her eternal home. Of eleven children born to Mrs. Payne only one survives, Mrs. M. J. Payne, with whom she made her home for several years.
The funeral service over the body was held at the residence on Wilson Street Tuesday afternoon at 4:00 p.m. The interment was made at ...


OBITUARY - Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Texas); June 08, 1909; page 12; (GenealogyBank.com):
               
CENTENARIAN DIES
Elizabeth Payne Was a Native of Indiana
WAXAHACHIE, Texas, June 8. --- Mrs. Elizabeth Payne, 100 years and 3 months old, died this morning at her home in Waxahachie. Mrs. Payne was a native of Indiana and had been a resident of Waxahachie for thirty-five years.
She was buried in June 1909 at Waxahachie City Cemetery, Waxahachie, Ellis Co., TX.
Note: LETTER:

Waxahachie, Ellis Co., Texas --- May the 6
                                   Elizabeth Payne to

Daniel and sary Dawalt – well brother i received a letter from you some time since and was glad that you remembered me once more – well i did not answer it for i have been so porely ever since i have had the neuralga i was sick with it nearly all last summer and winter but i got consideralla better in febuary and march so that i could go a bout the house and help doe the work and i walked out to the neighbors a time or toe but that was not verry fare well i thought i was a getting wel – but now i am a getting wors with that pain in the left side of my fase and head well you nor no bddy has enny idea how i suffer with it for i never saw enny boddy that had it as i had it the doctors said they never met with such a case before and they done all they cold and done no good and quit well if i get bad a gain i cant live through a nother such a spel my face is a paining me now that it most makes me jump but i will write on for if i get worse i cant write at all -- well i think i took a little cold last weeak for i got up a bout midnight to see the south side of the square burn down well it was a terable fire and four weeks a go their was one building burned down on the east side of the square that was the only frame building the the rest was brick and stone just new last november the west side of the square was a … … down they have got it all builded up a gain with stone and they are splendid buildings well the north side of the square was burned when we came hear they had commensed building it up with stone that side was accidently burned – but the west and east and south was set on fire but no boddy knows whooe done it -- well we have got a railroad hear at this town now and it makes business lively hear and the town is improveing rapidly – markit is good hear for most everything for all garden truck cabbage heads from ten to twenty cents young potatoes is high – we have not had enny potatoes yet but i will have in a few days my beans is a blooming – we have not much garden for the chickens eat it up – wee are not making much butter now we sell at twenty cents a pound I sell chickens at 25 eggs 10 well it has been dry all last year so dry that their was not much raise and so dry all winter that the peach treas never putout untill after it rained the last of march and in april then they bloomed but the peaches has nearly all droped of – well when it rained a nough to put water in our sisterns and wels we was glad – well henry build a house on the farm and man payne is a living their he is a running a milk wagggon i think he will doe some better now than what he had been doing they have five children all girls – well i had been thinking the last year past that iff i was wel i wold go back to old indiana and illinois and spend the summer but i don’t feel able to travel and so i gave it up i don’t expect ever to see Indiana a gain – well dickie and hattie and pappy are all dead and none but henry and jane and i and i think i wont bee hear a great while – i and henry is hear by our selvs henry has a hired hand all the time but he stays out on the place all week comes in satturday eavening – his name is judson clark he lived in new philadelpha when he was a boy he has lived with us for two years – well sally i wish you and daniel wold take a wild goose chase and come down and see us and texas to i shold think it wold be a great pleasure to you – i think if i was able to travel i wold bea a great pleasure to me – well tell your frank that i want him to write to old aunt betsy and john and all the rest of them well i want you to …. And often while we are on this earth for the time will soon roal a round that we will bee numberd with the dead and we shold bee readdy and prepared when the time comes well hear comes some children i cant think of what to write – i wold like to hear how fred leathermain is getting a long – well they have been having a big time hear they odfellows had a big selabration last weeak and the Sunday schools had a picnic and the rellles is a going to have a big reunian before long – the Texas people tryes to kepe up with the biges and get a head of the rest This is a beautiful mornind every thing is a groing nice the prairie looks so green and nice since the good rain we like to see it for it was so dry last summer that their was no green grass – well our boys is a going after dew berries next week they are getting ripe now – the mustang grapes is big enough to make pie

Note: This letter was written by Elizabeth (Dawalt) Payne to her brother, Daniel Dawalt, and his wife, Sarah (Tatlock) Dawalt. It was probably written between 1880 and 1882. The letter was found in a collection of Daniel Dawalt’s letters now in the Filson Library in Louisville, Kentucky.


NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Texas); March 15, 1909; page 4; (GenealogyBank.com)

She is 100 Years Old
Mrs. Elizabeth Payne is Grandmother of Mrs. E. J. Anderson
WAXAHACHIE, Texas, March 15. Mrs. Elizabeth Payne is today celebrating her hundredth birthday anniversary. Mrs. Payne was born in Indiana and came to Waxahachie thirty-five years ago. She is the grandmother of Mrs. S. J. Anderson, wife of Representative Anderson of Ellis county.

Children of Elizabeth Dawalt and William Payne

Elizabeth Dawalt

F, b. 14 December 1840, d. 7 March 1841
     Elizabeth Dawalt was born on 14 December 1840 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock. Elizabeth Dawalt died on 7 March 1841 at Washington Co., IN. She was buried in March 1841 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN, Headstone inscription:

ELIZABETH
DAWALT
BORN
DEC. 14, 1840
DIED
MAR. 7, 1841.

Elizabeth Ada Dawalt

F, b. 9 August 1889, d. 8 June 1948
     Elizabeth Ada Dawalt was born on 9 August 1889 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Francis M. Dawalt and Nancy Coombs. Elizabeth Ada Dawalt married Herbert Morris, son of Cary T. Morris and Caroline Lockenour, on 28 November 1917 at Washington Co., IN. Elizabeth Ada Dawalt died on 8 June 1948 at age 58.

Children of Elizabeth Ada Dawalt and Herbert Morris

Elma Samantha Dawalt

F, b. 3 February 1875, d. 12 October 1892
     Elma Samantha Dawalt was also known as "Mattie". She was born on 3 February 1875 at Fountain Co., IN. She was the daughter of John Dawalt and Anna Mariah Morris. Elma Samantha Dawalt died on 12 October 1892 at Fountain Co., IN, at age 17 OBITUARY - The Republican Leader, October 14, 1892

ELMA SAMANTHA DAWALT
Miss Mattie Dawalt died Wednesday morning at the home of her mother, Mrs Maria Dawalt, on the Hodges farm, four miles southeast of Salem, of typhoid fever. She was living with the family of John L. Williams until she was taken sick about five weeks ago. Since that time she has been at home confined to her bed. She was an intelligent and amiable young lady with many good traits that one her friends wherever she cast her lot. Burial took place at the Franklin graveyard Thursday afternoon.


OBITUARY #2 - The Salem Democrat, October 20, 1892, Canton Items

ELMA SAMANTHA DAWALT
The funeral of Mattie Dawalt took place at Franklin last Thursday afternoon and was largely attended. She was a young lady of high standing and was loved and respected by all who knew her.


OBITUARY #3 - The Republican Leader, October 28, 1892

Elma Samantha Dawalt was born February 3d, 1875, died October 12th, 1892, at the age of 17 years, 8 months and 9 days, of typhoid fever, after an illness of five weeks. Her burial took place at the Franklin graveyard, October 13th, at 2:30 p.m., and was attended by a large crowd of relatives and friends who looked with tearful eyes and breaking hearts upon her remains for the last time upon earth. Her loving disposition won for her a large circle of friends who are left, with a mother, brother, two sisters and many other relatives to mourn their loss. Oh Death! It seemed so hard to give her up just in the bloom of youth and merging into womanhood. She was the life and joy of their home and her death has cast a shadowy gloom over their home and fireside. She was a member of the M. E. church at Shiloh. She was an untiring Christian worker and left both a living and dying testimonal. Often during her last illness she would speak of going home and of the beautiful place over there saying she had not crossed the river but soon would. Her suffering was great yet her triumph was complete. She met death with a peaceful smile and died with her mother's name upon her lips.


NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - The Republican Leader, October 21, 1892, Canton Cullings

Some of our citizens attended the funeral of Mattie Dawalt at Franklin. There was a large attendance.


NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - The Republican Leader, December 9, 1892

The funeral sermon in memorial of Miss Mattie Dawalt, who died a few weeks ago, will be preached by Rev. S. J. Shake of Moberly, Ind., at Shiloh church three miles south-east of Salem, the fourth Sunday in December, which will be Christmas day at 10 o'clock a.m.


NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - The Republican Leader, December 23, 1892, Pekin Pointers

Rev. Shake will preach the funeral sermon of Mattie Dawalt at Shiloh next Sunday.


NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - The Republican Leader, December 30, 1892, Pekin Pointers

Rev. S. J. Shake, of Moberly, Ind., preached last Sunday and Monday night at Mt. Pleasant. He preached a funeral sermon of Mattie Dawalt at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday.

Cause of death: Typhoid fever. She was buried in October 1892 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Emily Dawalt1

F, b. 27 September 1854, d. 2 April 1868
     Emily Dawalt was born on 27 September 1854 at Washington Co., IN.1 She was the daughter of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1 Emily Dawalt died on 2 April 1868 at Washington Co., IN, at age 13. She was buried in April 1868 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Citations

  1. [S2090] 1860 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M653, Roll 306; FHL #803306.

Eva May Dawalt

F, b. 15 January 1878, d. 19 June 1939
     Eva May Dawalt was born on 15 January 1878 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Henry Cyrus Dawalt and Margaret Jane Norris.
Note: Did not marry.

Eva and her sister, Nora, compiled the early data (17 pages) on the Indiana Dawalts about 1928.

Eva May Dawalt died on 19 June 1939 at Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., MN, at age 61 OBITUARY - The Salem Leader or The Salem Democrat, Salem Indiana;__ __, 1939:

MISS EVA DAWALT DIES MONDAY AT MINNEAPOLIS
Relatives Here Notified of Burial Plans. Body To Be Cremated.
     Mrs. Laura Coffman received word from her daughter-in-law, Mrs. L. D. Coffman, of the death of Miss Eva Dawalt, which occurred Monday, at the University Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota, where she, the past four weeks had been a patient, following a stroke of paralysis suffered while a guest in the Coffman home.
     The second wire received Tuesday night stated: “Services for Eva will be held at three-thirty o’clock Thursday afternoon. Cremation will follow. Ashes held here awaiting further advice from Dr. Lee H. Streaker.”
     Miss Dawalt, 61, was the elder daughter of Henry and Margaret Norris Dawalt, of Salem.
     Following her graduation from Salem high school, she with her only sister, the late Mrs. Nora D. Short, entered Saint Mary of the Woods School, Terre Haute and later attended Indiana University.
     Following business training in Indianapolis, Miss Dawalt ably served as secretary for the Stout Furniture Company. For several years she has been in the Health Service department of the University of Minnesota.
     She was a member of the Congregational church, Minneapolis and Kappa Kappa Kappa, national social sorority.
     News of the death of Miss Dawalt, one of Salem’s finest women, brings sorrow to numerous friends, both here and elsewhere.
     Surviving are the niece and nephew, Mrs. L. F. Eder and Dr. Lee H. Streaker, of Santa Barbara, California.

Evelyn Lucille Dawalt

F, b. 18 April 1920, d. 13 September 2003
     Evelyn Lucille Dawalt was born on 18 April 1920 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Perre Commodore Dawalt and Ethel Clara Hinds. Evelyn Lucille Dawalt married Kenneth E. Trueblood, son of Otto Trueblood and Elsie Huckleberry, on 25 October 1939 at Washington Co., IN. Evelyn Lucille Dawalt died on 13 September 2003 at Marion Co., IN, at age 83 dates per SSDI, last residence Indianapolis. She was buried in September 2003 at Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Child of Evelyn Lucille Dawalt and Kenneth E. Trueblood

Francis M. Dawalt1

M, b. 1 February 1850, d. 21 February 1892
     Francis M. Dawalt was also known as "Frank". He was born on 1 February 1850 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1 Francis M. Dawalt married Nancy Coombs, daughter of Zachariah Coombs and Mary J. Wilsey, on 1 January 1879 at Washington Co., IN. Francis M. Dawalt died on 21 February 1892 at Washington Co., IN, at age 42 OBITUARY - The Salem Democrat, February 25, 1892

Frank Dawalt, of Franklin Township, died last Monday. He leaves a wife and several children. His father, Daniel Dawalt, is one of the oldest Masons in this part of the country.


OBITUARY #2 - The Republican Leader, February 26, 1892, New Philadelphia Items

Francis M. Dawalt was born Feb 1st, 1850, died Sunday night being 42 years and 20 days old. The deceased married a daughter of Zachariah Combs. They have six children, the youngest of which is but two weeks old. He was confined to his bed some 7 days, but had long been afflected with that dread disease consumption. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge of Canton but had not taken his demit to any other lodge when the Canton lodge disbanded. Rev. Cadwell of the M. E. church conducted the funeral, which took place at the family residence after which the remains were taken to the Franklin cemetery, followed by a large concourse of friends and relatives. He was the tenth child of a family of fourteen children of which only three are alive. His parents are perhaps the oldest couple in southern Indiana and live northeast of Canton.


OBITUARY #4 - The Republican Leader, February 26, 1892, Canton Cullings

Frank Dawalt, who died last Sunday evening of pneumonia, was buried at the Franklin cemetery Tuesday. He leaves a wife and six children to mourn their loss.


OBITUARY#4 - The Republican Leader, March 4, 1892

Francis M. Dawalt
Francis M. Dawalt departed this life February 21, 1892, after a brief illness of pneumonia, at the age of 42 years and 20 days. He was a good neighbor and was loved and respected by all who knew him. In the last hours of his illness he called his family around him and expressed his desire that his children should be reared in the Christian faith. He was a member of the Masonic Order. The funeral was conducted at the late residence by Rev. E. W. Chadwell, after which the remains were interred in Franklin graveyard. He leaves a wife and six children, also an aged father and many friends and other relatives.

He was buried in February 1892 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN, location per obituary -- headstone not found by Tracy Devault.

Children of Francis M. Dawalt and Nancy Coombs

Citations

  1. [S954] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, Series M432, Roll 179.

Gladys Alberta Dawalt

F, b. 5 September 1910, d. 15 November 1996
     Gladys Alberta Dawalt was born on 5 September 1910 at Salem, Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Perre Commodore Dawalt and Ethel Clara Hinds. Gladys Alberta Dawalt married Marshall Ray Colglazier, son of John Morton Colglazier and Lillie Edwina Marshall, on 2 December 1934 at Salem, Washington Co., IN. Gladys Alberta Dawalt died on 15 November 1996 at South Bend, St. Joseph Co., IN, at age 86. She was buried in November 1996 at Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Child of Gladys Alberta Dawalt and Marshall Ray Colglazier

Helen A. Dawalt1

F, b. 19 September 1899, d. 4 September 1991
     Helen A. Dawalt was born on 19 September 1899 at Washington Co., IN.1 She was the daughter of Milburn Dawalt and Vinnie Elnora Medlock.1 Helen A. Dawalt married Burl Neely, son of Walter Neely and Lillian Brannaman, on 20 October 1919 at Washington Co., IN. Helen A. Dawalt died on 4 September 1991 at age 91 dates per SSDI. She was buried in September 1991 at Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Children of Helen A. Dawalt and Burl Neely

Citations

  1. [S1205] 1900 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T623, Rolls 411 - 412; FHL #1240411 - 2.
  2. [S2167] 1930 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T626, Roll 631; FHL #2340366.

Henry Dawalt

M, b. 13 June 1806, d. 14 August 1831
     Henry Dawalt was born on 13 June 1806 at Tennessee. He was the son of Henry DeWald and Elizabeth Gross. Henry Dawalt died on 14 August 1831 at Washington Co., IN, at age 25. He was buried in August 1831 at Dawalt Family Cemetery, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Henry Dawalt1

M, b. 4 January 1837, d. 15 December 1850
     Henry Dawalt was born on 4 January 1837 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1 Henry Dawalt died on 15 December 1850 at Franklin Twp., Washington Co., IN, at age 13. He was buried in December 1850 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Citations

  1. [S954] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, Series M432, Roll 179.

Henry Cyrus Dawalt

M, b. 6 March 1852, d. 23 April 1925
     Henry Cyrus Dawalt was born on 6 March 1852 at Salem, Washington Co., IN. He was the son of John Gross Dawalt and Mary Tatlock. Henry Cyrus Dawalt married Margaret Jane Norris, daughter of James A. Norris and Elizabeth Coffman, on 29 March 1877 at Washington Co., IN.
Note: Sketch from History of Washington Co. Indiana.

Henry C. Dawalt -- his father and Grandfather
Henry C. Dawalt, farmer, Salem, Washington Co., was born on March 6, 1852, on the old Dawalt homestead and is the son of John and Mary Tatlock Dawalt. He grew up under the paternal roof, on the farm entered by his Grandfather from the government, and attended the Quaker Seminary, when it was conducted by Prof. Ponkha, about five miles east of Salem, which was at that time a famous school, students coming from all parts of Indiana.
John G. Dawalt, father of the subject of this sketch, was born about 1816 where the farmers store is now located on South Main Street, where his father then kept a Tavern. He was the son of Henry and Elizabeth Gross Dawalt -- he lies buried in the old Dawalt burial grounds on the farm. Mr. Dawalt was united in marriage with Mary Tatlock by whom he had four children: Emeline, Scott Henry C. and Commodore. Emeline died when about 11 years old; Scott died when about 16 years old and Commodore died in 1912.
HENRY DAWALT, the paternal Grandfather and wife, Elizabeth Gross Dawalt, were natives of York Co., Pa. and Rockingham W. Va. resp., and both of German lineage. Mr. Dawalt came to Washington County first in 1803, settling in Sect. 15 where he spent the remainder of his life, with the exception of four years. His death coming at the age of 90. Mrs. Dawalt died at the age of 75. He was commissioned Captain of the Militia by the Territorial Governor Harrison, receiving several promotions until he was made a Colonel of his Regiment and was at the head of his Company during the Pidgen Roost Massacre. Mr. Dawalt kept Tavern for four years in Salem, in the third house built in town, erected by himself in 1805-07. He bought many tracts of land.
On his farm, three miles east of Salem, was a cabin, that was used as a defence against the Indians, where settlers gathered for mutual protection during the time of Indian scares. Mr. Dawalt was frankly a "Pro-Slaver Man," and did his duty as he saw it, taking runaway slaves from the "underground railway," and returning them to their masters. Besides being a Colonel in the Militia, Henry Dawalt was a County Commissioner, serving several terms. To Henry and Elizabeth Dawalt were born the following children: Henry, Daniel, John G., Betsy (Eliza), Susan, Polly , Kate and a girl who died young. He died at the age of 90 and lies buried in the old Dawalt burial grounds on his old farm.
The name "Dawalt," was formerly spelled as Dewald and is of German origin, signifying, "of the woods."

Henry Cyrus Dawalt died on 23 April 1925 at Salem, Washington Co., IN, at age 73 OBITUARY - The Salem, Indiana Leader or the Democrat, May 1, 1925:

HENRY C. DAWALT
     The death of Henry C. Dawalt, one of this county’s most prominent citizens, occurred Thursday, April 23rd, as the result of severe injuries received as previously noted. His two daughters, Mrs. W. N. Short and Miss Eva Dawalt, were at his bedside and with him when the passing came.
     Mr. Dawalt held a very high position in the estimation or our people generally and the last service paid a high tribute to his worth as a citizen, neighbor and friend.
     This last service was held at Elmhurst, his country home east of Salem, and was very largely attended. Rev. W. D. Bartle, former pastor of the Christian church, came from New Albany and conducted the very impressive service. A quartette, Mrs. Garret Thompson, Mrs. J. L. Tucker, W. H. Crim and O. C. Zink sang three favorite hymns, “Lead Kindly Light,” “Son of My Soul” and Gracious Spirit, Love Devine,” with Mrs. O. E. Coffman as Accompanist.
     The following sketch was part of the service ---
     Henry C. Dawalt, second son of John Gross and Mary Tatlock Dawalt was born March 6, 1852 on the Dawalt homestead near Canton in Washington county. The records show that this farm has been in the Dawalt family since 1807 when it was entered by his grandfather, Henry Dawalt. Thus it is a significant fact that the cycle of his three score and ten years was lived in sight of ancestral ground, and that the years of his childhood, young manhood, maturity and age have been spent among the same circle of neighbors and friends.
     Of a studious temperament, he availed himself of all the educational advantages by the county in that early day. His primary education was received in the old McCoskey school house, followed by several years under the tutelage of the famous William Pinkham at the Blue River Academy. This school drew students from adjoining counties by its reputation as an educational center, and from its doors went forth men and women of education and culture whose influence upon this section of our state has been far reaching. He taught his first school at Boston at the age of 17 years, which was followed by several more years of teaching. Among the oldest citizens his reputation as a speller and cipherer in those early days may be readily recalled. In fact, his inherent culture and broad reading, his keenness of intellect won for him a reputation as one of the county’s outstanding teachers. This interest in cultural and intellectual lines continued throughout his life in the plans for his children and grandchildren. As his physique and constitution were not rugged, he decided to continue the agricultural pursuits of his family for his life work.
     On March 26, 1877 he was married to Margaret Jane Norris and established a home on the farm adjacent to his paternal home. In this place were born two daughters, Eva and Nora, who still live in this locality. His grandchildren are Margaret and Lee Henry Streaker in whose education and training he has been most vitally concerned. On Feb. 16, 1916, nine years ago, occurred the death of the wife and mother of this home.
     From his pioneer Pennsylvania ancestry he received those qualities of Thrift, industry and stability which have made him a successful farmer and exemplary citizen, a man who never stooped to the base or lowly, and the mainspring of whose life was the highest sense of honor. The law of his dealings with his fellowmen was the golden rule, and his deeds of generosity and kindness to his less favored associates and neighbors tell a story of modesty and human kindness not recorded by the annals of history. Home, family and county were the trinity around which his life revolved and to these trusts he was ever faithful and true.
     The burial was at Crown Hill cemetery, the remains being borne by his neighbors and old friends – Messrs. Charle Day, H. M. Trueblood, Wm. Day, Charles Etzeler, Lou Simpson, Lewis Williams, John Packwood and Jas. W. May.

He was buried in April 1925 at Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Children of Henry Cyrus Dawalt and Margaret Jane Norris

Jackson Dawalt1

M, b. 1840, d. 28 August 1864
     Jackson Dawalt was born in 1840 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1 Jackson Dawalt began military service Union Army, Sergeant, Company "F", 66th Indiana Volunteers. He died on 28 August 1864 at Rome, Floyd Co., GA. He was buried in September 1864 at Marietta National Cemetery, Marietta, Cobb Co., GA, First buried in the hospital cemetery in Rome, Floyd Co., Georgia. After the war he was moved to the Marietta National Cemetery, Marietta, Cobb Co., Georgia (Plot C, Row 0, grave 1339).

Medical Information: Jackson died at the Etowah House, a hotel that had been converted into a military hospital. About six weeks before his death he had been diagnosed with chronic diarrhea.


Note: The following two letters were written by Jackson Dawalt to his parents during the Civil War. Jackson died about six weeks after the second letter was written.

LETTER #1

May the 21 1864
Camp near Kingston Georgia. Dear father

I take my pen in hand this day to try to rite you a few lines to let you know that I am well and harty and I hope When this comes to you that it will find you well and harty

Well I can tell you that we have bin on a march every Since the 29 of april and we hant stoped at any plase longer then to take hit and then we moves along as fast as we Could

Well we have bin in Some fits and we Came out Safe and Sound but we have the hardest to doo yet and it Will be Some time before it will Gaw off but I hope we will Come out Safe and Sound.

Well father I havnt Got time to write very much at this plase for we will have to leave hear and push on Some other plase and I don’t know where we will Gaw to Next but I hope it will not be very fare off.

Well I will bring my leter to a Close by asken you to write Soon and often and I will write every Chance that I get to rite and derect to the ridgment and Co and it will come to me.

We are at Kingston, Georgia

Jackson Dawalt
To Daniel Danwalt

The boys is all Well and harty at this time that is With us

Jackson Dawalt
Daniel Dawalt


LETTER #2

July the 5 1864
Rome Georgia

Dear father and Mother I take my pen in hand to try and rite you a few lines to let you know how I am Geten I am Geten well fast as any one mite expect They dedicd it the Cronick diaree and I have had it. Stapt an me and I Can run around thru the town Well I hant hird from home for Some time and I would like to hear frum home the best kind but I expect that yu are So busey with your work that you Cant rite to me till you get thrue With your work and I don’t know hardly what to writ about

Well I can tell you that our forth of July was very dry thing but I wish that I Could Slept in on that day at home but I Could not and I am afraid that the ware will not be over again til another one roles around but if it is not over then it will not be very long till our time is out then Shall and Virten all of the vetern Soldiers is very Sick of there vetern They Say if they had not went in to it they would not a went in now Shall for there times would a bin out and then they Could went home and Staid there till they got ready to Come back

Well I will have to Close for this time Then rite Soon and often and you Can direct your leters to Rome Ga to the Etawah house has I do not know the number of it and they will Come to Safe and Sound

Jackson Dawalt
Daniel Dawalt


There is a copy of an interesting document in the Washington County Historical Society. It is a Confederate parol document which requires that Jackson Dawalt not take up arms again against the Confederate States. It was signed about two years before the above letters. It is strange that he signed with an "x" when it is clear from the above letters that he can write.

Richmond Sept 2nd 1862
Jackson Dawalt ?? Co. F 66th Reg Ind Vols a prisoner of war, captured by the Confederate troops under GENERAL KIRBY SMITH, and this day paroled, do solemnly swear that I will not take arms against the Confederate States, that I will neither give aid nor comfort to the enemies thereof, nor communicate any military information to them, until duly exchanged according to the usages of war. The violation of this parol will be punished with death
his
Witness Jackson x Dawalt
Capt J W Payne mark


Note from Janet Wise
At Rome, Georgia, Jackson Dawalt was buried in a cemetery set up for the hospital there, just West of town (old town). I found his name in the hand-written records of the men buried at Rome, Georgia. who were removed to the Marietta National Cemetery in Marietta, Georgia. That cemetery had 20 rows, 460 graves in all. They marked the graves with what they called headboards, made of wood. In the hospital cemeteries, they were buried in order of death. The men were re-interred at Marietta National Cemetery a couple of years after the war. Even there, they were marked with wooden headboards. It was much later (around 1880?) that the graves were marked with stones.

The following two letters were written by Jackson Dawalt to his parents during the Civil War. Jackson died about six weeks after the second letter was written.

LETTER #1

May the 21 1864
Camp near Kingston Georgia. Dear father

I take my pen in hand this day to try to rite you a few lines to let you know that I am well and harty and I hope When this comes to you that it will find you well and harty

Well I can tell you that we have bin on a march every Since the 29 of april and we hant stoped at any plase longer then to take hit and then we moves along as fast as we Could

Well we have bin in Some fits and we Came out Safe and Sound but we have the hardest to doo yet and it Will be Some time before it will Gaw off but I hope we will Come out Safe and Sound.

Well father I havnt Got time to write very much at this plase for we will have to leave hear and push on Some other plase and I don’t know where we will Gaw to Next but I hope it will not be very fare off.

Well I will bring my leter to a Close by asken you to write Soon and often and I will write every Chance that I get to rite and derect to the ridgment and Co and it will come to me.

We are at Kingston, Georgia

Jackson Dawalt
To Daniel Danwalt

The boys is all Well and harty at this time that is With us

Jackson Dawalt
Daniel Dawalt


LETTER #2

July the 5 1864
Rome Georgia

Dear father and Mother I take my pen in hand to try and rite you a few lines to let you know how I am Geten I am Geten well fast as any one mite expect They dedicd it the Cronick diaree and I have had it. Stapt an me and I Can run around thru the town Well I hant hird from home for Some time and I would like to hear frum home the best kind but I expect that yu are So busey with your work that you Cant rite to me till you get thrue With your work and I don’t know hardly what to writ about

Well I can tell you that our forth of July was very dry thing but I wish that I Could Slept in on that day at home but I Could not and I am afraid that the ware will not be over again til another one roles around but if it is not over then it will not be very long till our time is out then Shall and Virten all of the vetern Soldiers is very Sick of there vetern They Say if they had not went in to it they would not a went in now Shall for there times would a bin out and then they Could went home and Staid there till they got ready to Come back

Well I will have to Close for this time Then rite Soon and often and you Can direct your leters to Rome Ga to the Etawah house has I do not know the number of it and they will Come to Safe and Sound

Jackson Dawalt
Daniel Dawalt


There is a copy of an interesting document in the Washington County Historical Society. It is a Confederate parol document which requires that Jackson Dawalt not take up arms again against the Confederate States. It was signed about two years before the above letters. It is strange that he signed with an "x" when it is clear from the above letters that he can write.

Richmond Sept 2nd 1862
Jackson Dawalt ?? Co. F 66th Reg Ind Vols a prisoner of war, captured by the Confederate troops under GENERAL KIRBY SMITH, and this day paroled, do solemnly swear that I will not take arms against the Confederate States, that I will neither give aid nor comfort to the enemies thereof, nor communicate any military information to them, until duly exchanged according to the usages of war. The violation of this parol will be punished with death
his
Witness Jackson x Dawalt
Capt J W Payne mark


Note from Janet Wise
At Rome, Georgia, Jackson Dawalt was buried in a cemetery set up for the hospital there, just West of town (old town). I found his name in the hand-written records of the men buried at Rome, Georgia. who were removed to the Marietta National Cemetery in Marietta, Georgia. That cemetery had 20 rows, 460 graves in all. They marked the graves with what they called headboards, made of wood. In the hospital cemeteries, they were buried in order of death. The men were re-interred at Marietta National Cemetery a couple of years after the war. Even there, they were marked with wooden headboards. It was much later (around 1880?) that the graves were marked with stones.



Citations

  1. [S954] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, Series M432, Roll 179.

James Buchannan Dawalt1

M, b. 26 August 1856, d. 18 October 1924
     James Buchannan Dawalt was born on 26 August 1856 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1 James Buchannan Dawalt married Margaret Ann Thompson, daughter of John Bruce Thompson and Martha Ellen Tatlock, on 13 March 1879 at Washington Co., IN. James Buchannan Dawalt died on 18 October 1924 at Franklin Twp., Washington Co., IN, at age 68 OBITUARY - The Salem Democrat, Salem Indiana; October __, 1924:

James B. Dawalt
     James B. Dawalt, son of Daniel and Sarah Dawalt was born in Washington County, Indiana, August 26, 1856 and died at his home six miles northeast of Salem, Saturday evening October 18, 1924, aged 68 years, 1 month and 22 days.
     He was united in marriage to Margaret Thompson, March 13, 1879. To this union were born two sons, Winfield of Salem, and Claud of Bloomington, and one daughter who died in infancy. The mother of these children passed away June 17, 1888. His second marriage was to Nancy Coombs Dawalt, April 3, 1901. She and her three daughters Mrs. Guy O. Newby of Ville Grove, Ill., and Mrs. Ada Morris at Salem, also survive. Besides the above mentioned he leaves a brother Samuel Dawalt of near Salem and a sister Katherine Johnson of Little York. About three years before his death he united with the West Point M. E. church under the pastorate of Rev. J. E. Leist and was thereafter a devoted member of that organization, although physically unable during any of this time to attend services. He was held in high esteem by all who knew him, and will be greatly missed by his family, friends and neighbors.
     Services were conducted by Rev. J. E. Leist at Franklin church, October 20, 11 a. m. and the body interred in the cemetery nearby.

He was buried in October 1924 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Children of James Buchannan Dawalt and Margaret Ann Thompson

Citations

  1. [S2090] 1860 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M653, Roll 306; FHL #803306.

John Dawalt1

M, b. 30 April 1848, d. 7 November 1882
     John Dawalt was born on 30 April 1848 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1 John Dawalt married Anna Mariah Morris, daughter of Peter G. Morris and Samantha Elizabeth Still, on 7 February 1872 at Washington Co., IN. John Dawalt died on 7 November 1882 at Washington Co., IN, at age 34 OBITUARY - The Salem Democrat, November 22, 1882, Canton Items dated November 13, 1882

John Dawalt, who had been lingering for a long time with consumption, died last Tuesday and was buried at Franklin Wednesday by the Masonic Lodge of Canton, of which he was a member.


OBITUARY #2 - The Salem Democrat, November 22, 1882, New Philadelphia Items dated November 17, 1882

John Dawalt died of consumption on the 7th inst. He was a son of Daniel Dawalt and a good citizen.


NEWSPAPER ARTICLE - November, 1882

John Dawalt who died November 7, 1882, was married to Anna Mariah Morris February 7, 1872. She was born June 6, 1855. John Dawalt was born in Washington County and lived there until his death. His parents were Sarah Tatlock and Daniel Dawalt. Sarah was born August 14, 1816; Daniel was born July 8, 1812. The marriage occurred February 11, 1836. The Dawalt family is descended from Henrich Dewalt, the pioneer of one branch of the family that came to America. He was born in Palatinate County along the Rhine on April 10, 1745, and was one of the representatives of German people who accepted the invitation of William Penn to cross the ocean and take up their abode in the Province of Pennsylvania. The original family, however, was from France and were descendants of Baron De Vaulx from Lorraine. Henrich Dewalt served under General George Washington in the Revolutionary War. His descendant, Henry Dawalt, Sr. built the third house in Salem in 1801.


He was buried in November 1882 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN, Headstone inscription:

JOHN DAWALT
DIED
NOV. 7, 1882
AGED
34 Yrs. 5 Ms. 12 Ds.

A husband kind,
A father dear,
A faithful friend lies
buried here.

Children of John Dawalt and Anna Mariah Morris

Citations

  1. [S954] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, Series M432, Roll 179.
  2. [S2084] 1880 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T9, Roll 321; FHL #1254321.

John Gross Dawalt

M, b. 25 January 1817, d. 24 December 1895
     John Gross Dawalt was born on 25 January 1817 at Washington Co., IN. He was the son of Henry DeWald and Elizabeth Gross.
Note: Letter written by John Gross Dawalt to his cousin John Davault of Leesburg, Tennessee.

Indiana, Washington Co.
February 5th 1844

Dear Cousin and Friends:

We again, for the second time, write you a letter to inform you that we are all well at this time, and do most sincerely hope that when these few lines are received by you that they will find you all in the same state of health.
We have had a rainy and muddy winter here. It has been very moderate until about the 26th of January, then it changed very cold, with some snow and have been very stormy -- almost impossible, for in many places Waggoners are obliged to throw down the fences on the roads and make the best of their way through the farms. Our crops for the past year are very good, except wheat was not as good as usual.
Pork is $2.00 per hundred net weight; wheat 56c and 65c per bushel; corn 75c and $1.00 per bu; Barrell flour, $4.00 and $5.00; Oats 12c and 20c per bu; new bacon $3.50 per hog round. The measles are in every section of this country and are spreading in deffernt parts of the state. but happy to say that no deaths have occurred from the disease -- no other diseases prevail.
We cannot say when any of us will visit Tennessee. For in the spring we will be very busy and Father is going to Pennsylvania and there will be no chance for us to leave home. We have not heard from any of you since last winter (1843) and would like very much for you to write us and inform us how all of you are doing. I remain single yet, but I have a strong notion to see which is the best, the Single or the married life, and to choose a girl and try what I can do in the married life, as I have lived a single life this long. We wish you to give us our best respects to all our relatives and to your friends, also I do not know as I have anything more to write you.

This from your most affectionate Cousin,

John Dawalt

(This letter written Feburary 5, 1844, mentioned that he might get married -- he did in December of the same year.)

John Gross Dawalt married Mary Tatlock, daughter of Joshua Tatlock and Ann Whidbee, on 1 December 1844 at Washington Co., IN. John Gross Dawalt died on 24 December 1895 at Salem, Washington Co., IN, at age 78 OBITUARY - The Salem, Indiana Democrat, December 27, 1895

John G. Dawalt died at the residence of one of his sons on the old family homestead, three miles east of Salem, and his funeral will occur next Sunday forenoon, interment in the family burying ground. Mr. Dawalt was born in Salem 78 or 79 years ago and his parents came from Tennessee. Most of his life was spent on the farm where he died. He married Mary Tatlock who preceded him to the spirit world 12 or 15 years ago. Of their four children two are living. Mr. Dawalt was a member of the Christian Church and was a good citizen.

He was buried in December 1895 at Dawalt Family Cemetery, Dawalt farm, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Children of John Gross Dawalt and Mary Tatlock

John Lawrence Dawalt1

M, b. 29 August 1908, d. 14 December 1994
     John Lawrence Dawalt was born on 29 August 1908 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Milburn Dawalt and Vinnie Elnora Medlock.1 John Lawrence Dawalt married Gertrude Ray, daughter of John Ray and Ida Belle Fleenor, no children.2 John Lawrence Dawalt died on 14 December 1994 at Washington Co. (probably), IN, at age 86 dates per SSDI, last residence Salem. He was buried in December 1994 at Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Citations

  1. [S2165] 1910 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T624, Roll 387; FHL #1374400.
  2. [S2577] 1940 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T627, Roll 1107.

John Scott Dawalt

M, b. 25 February 1850, d. 15 February 1869
     John Scott Dawalt was born on 25 February 1850 at Washington Co., IN. He was the son of John Gross Dawalt and Mary Tatlock. John Scott Dawalt died on 15 February 1869 at Washington Co., IN, at age 18. He was buried in February 1869 at Dawalt Family Cemetery, Dawalt farm, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Katherine Dawalt

F, b. 15 January 1880, d. 1942
     Katherine Dawalt was born on 15 January 1880 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Francis M. Dawalt and Nancy Coombs. Katherine Dawalt married Guy Orpheus Newby, son of Stanford Newby and Semira Morris, on 19 January 1901 at Washington Co., IN. Katherine Dawalt lived in April 1910 at Villa Grove, Douglas Co., IL.1 She died in 1942. She was buried in 1942 at Crown Hill Cemetery, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Child of Katherine Dawalt and Guy Orpheus Newby

Citations

  1. [S2578] 1910 Federal Census, Douglas County, Illinois. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T624, Roll 285; FHL #1374298.

Gen. Kenneth Francis Dawalt

M, b. 18 August 1911, d. 15 December 2000
     Gen. Kenneth Francis Dawalt was born on 18 August 1911 at Salem, Washington Co., IN. He was the son of Daniel F. Dawalt and Nelle V. Whitson. Gen. Kenneth Francis Dawalt was educated at DePauw University, Greencastle, IN. He was graduated in 1936 at West Point Military Academy, Highland Falls, Orange Co., NY. He died on 15 December 2000 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Bethesda, Montgomery Co., MD, at age 89 Military Press Release:

Kenneth F. Dawalt, 89, an Army brigadier general who retired in 1970 as deputy chief of Army research and development for international programs, died December 15, 2000, at Walter Reed Army Medical Center after a heart attack.

General Dawalt served 34 years in the Army after his graduation from the U.S. Military Academy in 1936, and for much of his career he specialized in international research and development. As a member of the defense element of the U.S. delegation to NATO, he helped NATO countries reestablish and build research and development capabilities devastated by World War II.

From 1941 to 1945, he was an instructor, then assistant professor of physics at the academy in West Point, New York. He was assigned to the 8th U.S. Army headquarters in Japan during the military occupation after World War II.

During the Korean War, General Dawalt commanded an armored field artillery battalion in combat operations, and he received a Silver Star for gallantry. He also was awarded a Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, and on his retirement a Distinguished Service Medal.

General Dawalt, a resident of the Virginian retirement community in Fairfax, was born in Salem, Indiana, and attended Depauw University before enrolling at West Point, where he was basketball captain in the 1935-36 season.

During his military career, he commanded the 2nd Army Missile Command at Fort Carson, Colorado, and an artillery brigade in Okinawa. He graduated from the Army War College and the Command and General Staff College.

On retiring from the Army, he was the Washington-based vice president for six years of European Aerospace Corp., which is based in Paris.

General Dawalt had been a resident of the Washington area since 1963. He was an avid golfer and a member of the Army Navy Country Club.

For 15 years, he was an usher at Immanuel-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church in Alexandria.

Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Kathryn Dawalt of Fairfax; two daughters, Karie Nicholson of Houston and Karen Bayard Gould of Laguna Beach, Calif; and a grandson.

He was buried in December 2000 at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Arlington Co., VA.
Note: Kenneth Dawalt letter to Mrs. Leonard Berkey:

European Aerospace Corporation

13 march 1972

Dear Mrs. Berkey,
Greetings from the Washington and the Virginia contingent of the Dawalt family.
During a recent visit to Phyllis Kindley's house to meet Mike (Waldo W.) and Jane Colglazier, Phyllis gave me a clipping from a recent Salem newspaper. I have attached a copy of that article.
Karie and I have a copy of the Stevens' History of Washington County. However, there is more important information about my family background in the attached newspaper article than in the Stevens' History.
I would appreciate it if you would tell me (if you can) the source of Mr. Walter Hilton's information. Naturally, should that information be in one book or source we would like to get a copy.
I hope that this letter finds you in good health and that you will not mind receiving such a request.
With warm regards,
Ken Dawalt

The following newspaper article is the one referred to in the above letter:

"Historical Society Enlightened With History Of Dawalt Family
The Washington County Historical Society met at 2 p.m. on Saturday, July 31, assembling for the first time in the Assembly Room in the Steven Memorial Museum. President Clara Marie Burns called the meeting to order and the minutes of the May meeting were read and approved, there having been no June meeting.
Mr. Everett Dean reported that some painting and minor repairs are to be made on the Hay House. Also plans are being made for the installation of the John I. Morrison Gateway, a memorial commemorating the many Revolutionary soldiers buried in Washington County, and a wrought iron railing on the porch of the museum.
Mrs. Lennie Berkey reported that work is still being done on the interior of the Hay House and some help is needed.
A committee consisting of Eugene Cook, Helen Burgess, William Ferguson and Jack Mahuron was appointed to work on amending the by-laws.
The program was presented by Mr. Walter Hilton. He spoke of the arrival and early history of the Dawalt family in America. In 1763 there lived in the Palatine Country, west of the Rhine River in Germany, one Heindrick DerWaldt. Since the French controlled this land at times, the name was often spelled Devault. There are some 32 spellings of the name. About 1766 Heindrich, his wife Maria and at least one child left Rotterdam and came to America. There trip on the ship "Chance" lasted six months and they suffered many hardships. Just imagine spending such a long period on shipboard with no sanitation, probably no fresh fruit or vegetables and lacking all the comforts of the modern day ships.
Heindrich and his family settled in Manheim Township, York Co., Pennsylvania. A follower of Martin Luther, Heindrich took an active part in the Lutheran Church, helping build the third Lutheran Church. He and Maria were buried in the cemetery there but in 1918 the entire cemetery was removed to the Mt. Olivet Cemetery. Heindrick rests there under a tombstone bearing the following inscription: "Death is a blessing to all mankind. It is the evening to that restless day which we call life."
During the Revolution, Heindrick enlisted in the Continental army, whith a good record. In 1790 he took four sons to east Tennessee where he purchased 1300 acres in Sullivan County, Frederick and Valentine were given one farm and Henry and Gabriel the other. Frederick built the DeVault Tavern at Leesburg and Valentine built one at Wautugua near Johnson City. Today the Devaults in Tennessee still carry the French spelling of the name.
Henry married Kitty Gross and came to Washington County about 1810. Much has been written about both the Tri-County and Stevens' Histories. He helped in the naming of Salem, was captain of the first militia, led the pursuit after the Pidgeon Roost Massacure and helped in the rescue of the Menaugh and Hensley boys. Harry and Kitty had seven children and from sons David and John Gross Dawalt are descended the Dawalt family of Salem today. (The remainder of the article is missing.)

Note: There are many factual errors in this article.

Martin Dawalt1

M, b. 24 February 1839, d. 4 April 1863
     Martin Dawalt was born on 24 February 1839 at Washington Co., IN.1 He was the son of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1
Note: LETTER FROM MARTIN DAWALT TO JUDY STEWARD, March 30, 1860

March the 30 1860
Dear Sir I take my pen in hand to let you know that I am well at preasent and when these few lines comes to hand will find you enjoying the same health and I would like to see you bad and I want you to come to see me the nesct time that I see you some thing rite funny to tell you I was sory that I went to bed that night that you waSore her If ihad a node what ino know I would Mr Allen folks is all well so is Loakaway and Jacob I wood like far you to comovr hure and play the little white doge with me I fell in love with you that night my Dear be loved friend ther has ben twelve weddings Over here wide is the ocen deep is the see Sand in your arms I would like to bee if you love me as I love you we will not belongs tarying remember me remember the roses is red the vilets is blue candy is sweet and so or you it strangs my heart when you are near gits in a great palpitation o dear me o dear me o dear me but it is abad situation now i must begin to draw my leter to aclose remember me and writ soon as you get this leter direct your leters to Mony po from Judy steward to Martin Davalt and I will kiss you sweet cat.

Martin Dawalt died on 4 April 1863 at age 24. He was buried in April 1863 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Citations

  1. [S954] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, Series M432, Roll 179.

Mary Dawalt

F, b. 12 April 1883, d. 12 June 1907
     Mary Dawalt was born on 12 April 1883 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of Francis M. Dawalt and Nancy Coombs. Mary Dawalt married Zanna Nicholson, son of James K. Polk Nicholson and Elvira Gibbons, on 3 March 1903 at Washington Co., IN, no children. Mary Dawalt died on 12 June 1907 at age 24.

Mary Emeline Dawalt

F, b. 25 May 1846, d. 4 September 1856
     Mary Emeline Dawalt was born on 25 May 1846 at Washington Co., IN. She was the daughter of John Gross Dawalt and Mary Tatlock. Mary Emeline Dawalt died on 4 September 1856 at Washington Co., IN, at age 10. She was buried in September 1856 at Dawalt Family Cemetery, Dawalt farm, Salem, Washington Co., IN.

Mary Jane Dawalt1

F, b. 26 February 1844, d. 18 February 1883
     Mary Jane Dawalt was born on 26 February 1844 at Washington Co., IN.1 She was the daughter of Daniel Dawalt and Sarah Tatlock.1
Note: LETTER FROM ANNA JANE TRUEBLOOD TO MARY J. DAWALT - November 5, 1864

Salem, Iowa November 5th 1864

Miss Mary J Davalt
My Dear Cousin

I have again brought out my writing utensils for the express purpose of answering your verry welcome letter which came duly to hand I was glad to learn that your health was improving and I hope ere long that you may be well and I was also sorry to here of your brother death but such must happen troublesome world and suppose we hav to submit our family are tolerably well excepting Father who is never verry well though he is able to work some yet I think he stands it verry well considering his age he will be 79 if he lives till winter I am sorry to here of Mary Bindys sickness which I am afraid will be the end of her though I have heard several times of her being sick but I cant find out what ailes her tell me what has become of chris and whether he is married or not or ever going to be I have not heard of Mary Fouts for so long what can the matter be I expect her attention is taken up by some poor sighing widower who would give half of his Inheritance for a smack at her roseate cheek tell her to write and tell me as to the truth of the matter
I was sadly disappointed in not getting your picture in your last letter as I had fondly hoped to see it then but I suppose I will have to wait till you get ready which I hope wont be long as I am anxious to get it So no more at present but I remain your affectionate Cousin till death

Mary J Davalt
Annie J. Trueblood


LETTER FROM ANNA JANE TRUEBLOOD TO MARY J. DAWALT - July 26, 1865

Salem Henry Co Iowa July 26th 1865

Miss Mary J Davalt

Most Kind Cousin
I once more seat myself for the purpose of answering you kind letter which I received not long since and was glad to here from you & learn you were well you need a good scolding for not writing sooner but I guess as long as I am not verry well acquainted with you I’ll keep still on the subject this time you were wanting me to spend the 4th with you I guess it would not have done much good as I lay on the lounge at home all day 4th July I have been unwell for several weeks past but am getting better now I guess I’ll soon be sound again. they had gay times out here there was speaking both at Mt. Pleasant & Salem. there was a big ball at night at Salem and Fire works at night at Mt Pleasant you write the Soldiers are comeing the Iowa boys are comeing to a few at at a Since I am in hopes they will soon all be home and then well have a gay time I am going to when my man comes home
we are having a verry wet time here now it rains here nearly every day and people are having a serious time with their harvesting we have not much fruit here this summer as the frost & worms were rather to hard for fruit it is not our calculations to have peaches but we generally other fruit Still this year there is not much
I think you & Mary Fouts might Saddle up your ponies some nice evening its not verry far and it would be a nice little ride for you I want to come back there but I don’t see as I am ever going to get the chance so no more at present only you had better write sooner another time if you know whats good for you your Cousin
Jane Trueblood Mary J Davalt



LETTER FROM ANNA JANE TRUEBLOOD TO MARY J. DAWALT - October 1865

                         Salem, Henry Co. Iowa October 1865

Miss Mary J. Davalt
Kind Cousin
I take the present opportunity to answer your very acceptable letter which I received some time ago but have neglected to reply until now we are all well as usual and hope when this reaches you it will find you enjoying the same good health. You say the folks are all getting Married around you and you are to wait and See who is left for you. Now my advice to you would be to pitch in while they are going go it while you are young for when you get old you cant go it any more
You wished to know when I was going to marry. You have asked a question which I cant answer my self. It may be in two months or it may be twenty years for what I know. But Ill keep you posted up on the matter
You say you have peaches back and that is a luxury which we do not enjoy here unless they are brought here Missouri or Illinois
My brother went to Illinois and got a load to sell. I eat all I could then but have been spunky ever since because I did not eat more. I wonder what has become of that bachelor or widower or what ever he was that admired that picture of mine if you see him any more tell him tell him I wish him all happiness in this world and the world to come and also I if I cant get any body else I will send for him do you think I could get him Say when you write tell me if Benson Fouts has come home I have nearly lost the run of him also what Mary Fouts is doing. Tell your Brother Dan he had Better spend some of his time writing to me as I am just as good as the other girls and allso to send me his Photograph I have not got my Album half full yet and it holds fifty. I will close for the present by requesting you to write soon give My Compliments to your parents and Brothers & Sisters

Ever your Cousin
Mary J Davalt Jane Trueblood


Tracy Devault's note: I think Anna Jane Trueblood and Mary J. Dawalt, although close in age, were first cousins, once removed. I believe that Mary J. Dawalt’s maternal grandmother, Ann Whitbee (or Whidbee), was the sister to Mary Polly Whitbee. Mary Polly Whitbee was born 29 December 1803 in North Carolina. On 18 December 1824, in Washington County, Indiana she married William Trueblood. (Mary Whitbee was William’s second wife.) William and Mary had seven children of their own, the last being Anna Jane Trueblood born 28 December 1842 in Blue River, Washington County, Indiana. The Trueblood family moved to Henry County, Iowa. Both of Anna Jane Trueblood’s parents are buried there. Anna Jane Trueblood married Samuel Hocket on 22 March 1866. Mary J. Dawalt married Mathew P. Sill on 11 April 1866. These letters were found in the Daniel Dawalt collection of letters at the Filson Historical Society in Louisville, Kentucky.

Mary Jane Dawalt married Matthew Simpson Still, son of George Still and Anna Hawn, on 11 April 1866. Mary Jane Dawalt lived in August 1870 at Gibson Twp., Washington Co., IN.2 She died on 18 February 1883 at age 38. She was buried in February 1883 at Franklin Cemetery, Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.

Children of Mary Jane Dawalt and Matthew Simpson Still

Citations

  1. [S954] 1850 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, Series M432, Roll 179.
  2. [S2094] 1870 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series M593, Roll 369; FHL #545868.

Milburn Dawalt

M, b. 4 August 1880, d. 13 April 1971
     Milburn Dawalt was born on 4 August 1880 at Washington Co., IN. He was the son of John Dawalt and Anna Mariah Morris. Milburn Dawalt married Vinnie Elnora Medlock, daughter of Elijah Isaac Medlock and Mary Amanda Cauble, on 16 August 1899 at Washington Co., IN. Milburn Dawalt lived in April 1910 at Washington Twp., Washington Co., IN.1 He married Bernice Nicholson, daughter of Fred Oliver Nicholson and Mabel Louella Payne, on 23 April 1944 at Salem, Washington Co., IN. Milburn Dawalt died on 13 April 1971 at age 90.

Children of Milburn Dawalt and Vinnie Elnora Medlock

Citations

  1. [S2165] 1910 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T624, Roll 387; FHL #1374400.
  2. [S1205] 1900 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. Microfilm Image, NARA Series T623, Rolls 411 - 412; FHL #1240411 - 2.

Nora E. Dawalt

F, b. 16 September 1879, d. 15 August 1937
     Nora E. Dawalt was born on 16 September 1879. She was the daughter of Henry Cyrus Dawalt and Margaret Jane Norris. Nora E. Dawalt married Lee Henry Streaker, son of Henry Streaker and Sarah J. Lee, on 11 June 1902 at Washington Co., IN. Nora E. Dawalt married William N. Short, son of George Washington Short and Elizabeth Russell, on 7 February 1911, no children. Nora E. Dawalt died on 15 August 1937 at age 57.

Children of Nora E. Dawalt and Lee Henry Streaker